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Month: March 2016

Searching for the customer experience in #ActuallySheCan

Industries today are focusing more and more on customer experience. So what does this mean for pharmaceutical marketers? That you absolutely need to build a customer experience for your product or brand.  What do we mean by customer experience? Customer experience is about building an intentional or planned customer journey. It starts off by leading and then it is maintained though loyalty. I recently came across Allergan’s website  #ActuallySheCan, and did a review on their approach to customer experience.

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What is #ActuallySheCan website about?

As described by Allergan “this campaign is about fostering a discussion among women, not at them. This is a platform and medium for women to get more educated,” Allergan then goes on to explain “This is not just a traditional social-media platform with standard banner ads and tweeting content about a product.”  Right, so let’s move on to content.

Is the content relevant, valuable and useful?

Content experience is about making user experience a good experience. A good experience is what will create your lead and then loyalty.  According to Content Marketing Institute content must be relevant and valuable. In my opinion I really find it hard to see any information at all on the website, let alone it being useful to me. Maybe if I register to their newsletter / email I will receive useful information. But why would I register for information if I can’t find any on the website? May I suggest maybe to research and try to understand your customers first and then build your content experience on that.

Engaging on social media channels?

FaceBook, Twitter, & Instagram photos and messages are pretty much the same across all channels. Trying to foster a discussion with women? Can’t really see a discussion going on. Appears to be just a push of general messages. Suggestion, relevant and useful content will increase your user experience to share and engage with others. Content experience and sharing can only be built after researching and trying to understand your customers.

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Testimonials or influencers?

In seeking an authentic and balanced tone, Allergan states, that it partnered with celebrities including actor Lea Michele, reality television personality Lo Bosworth and Youtube personality iJustine. Maybe what you are looking for are “influencers” more than testimonials. Influencers have the trust of their followers and care very deeply about giving their opinion that is valuable and relevant for their followers. Testimonials are just a traditional marketing “quick” fix voice behind a brand. The outcome is very different. With influencers you will create a true following and fulfill the loyalty part of the customer experience journey.

Are you using emojis and “shemojis” just to attract millennials?

Millennials, although frequent users of emojis,  don’t want brands to communicate with them using emojis. They want to interact with the company in a different ways. Why not ask them how they would like to engage with you? As for “shemojis”, Allergan defines “shemojis” as a website featured technology that allows women to create their own emojis by uploading selfies so users can convert them to “shemojis”.  In my opinion it is always best to first test photo emojis such as is the case with “shemojis” first as a social experiment. See how it resonates before launching to a broader audience.

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Can we please have health emojis?

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Why should we consider having health emojis?

92% of the population uses emojis. Regardless of one’s native language, emojis’ are universal and can be understood by all. Images are processed faster in the brain than text is, so there are benefits to choosing a visual icon over words to describe or convey a sentiment.

What are emojis?

Emojis are small digital images or icons used to express an idea, emotion, etc, in electronic communication

What is the origin of emojis?

Born in the 1990s in Japan and from e “picture” + moji “letter, character”. They became very popular with their inclusion in Apple’s iPhone, followed by Android and other mobile operating systems.

How are brands incorporating emojis in their marketing mix today?

Super Bowl 50 (2016), Twitter, partnered with brands like Pepsi and Anheuser-Busch and Verizon to offer emojis with a Super Bowl theme, sometimes referred to as “admoji”. Super Bowl custom emoji

Twitter has selected celebrities that can overlay emoji (style icons) onto their photos.

Lifetime has experimented with auto – response campaigns using certain hashtags to unlock content.

Facebook launched (Feb 24, 2016) “Reactions” a new feature that allows users to respond to posts with six emotion choices (angry, sad, wow, haha, yay, and love)

Has healthcare experimented with emojis? 

I am very happy to see that GE Healthcare experimented using emojis at the #RNSA15 (a professional radiology medical device conference).

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Wearables and pharma where you at?

Let’s start by defining wearables. Wearable technologies (or wearables) are items embedded with small, inexpensive electronic sensors that can be comfortably worn – such as clothing, watches and jewelry.  They are fast becoming a critical tool for medical researchers and drugmakers. Bloomberg reports that according to the National Institutes of Health’s records there are 299 clinical trials using wearables.

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(image from Piwek L, Ellis DA, Andrews S, Joinson A (2016) The Rise of Consumer Health Wearables: Promises and Barriers. PLoS Med 13(2): e1001953. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001953)

What’s in it for pharmaceutical companies?

By providing clinical trial participants with wearables, pharmaceutical companies can gather more accurate information that could help to streamline clinical trials and support patient care. Wearables may also help pharmaceutical companies to provide drug effectiveness data to insurance companies or governments that support their treatments are effective, therefore helping in reducing unnecessary prescriptions and lowering health care costs.

Fitbit and Apple watch are just two of the many activity trackers on the market today. Both are currently capable of tracking vital signs such as heart rate, exercise and movement levels. From a drug development and early drug safety capturing perspective, the real-time data input is more accurate than human memory and could provide valuable information.

How will the latest Fitbit lawsuit impact wearable use in pharmaceutical clinical trials and should pharmaceutical companies worry? Would this exclude it from the clinical settings, where it would have an enormous potential?

Looks like the future may be murky as some wearables may be unreliable and potentially be misleading. Devices are marketed under the premise that they will help improve general health and fitness, but the majority of manufactures provide no empirical evidence to support effectiveness to their products.

Fitbit was hit in January 2016 with a class action lawsuit regarding it’s heart rate monitoring.

According to the complaint, one plaintiff had a trainer manually count her heart rate during a workout after buying her Charge HR last year. While the trainer recorded a heart rate of 160 beats per minute, her Fitbit device said her rate was at 82. The other plaintiffs cite similar experiences with their Fitbit devices.

‘With those margins of error, the Heart Rate Trackers are effectively worthless as heart rate devices,” the lawsuit said.

Fitbit was also issued a recall in 2014 after customers complained of rashes after wearing the devices and lawsuit over misleading advertising.

Response from Fitbit, Fitbit trackers, are not meant to be medical or scientific devices.

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