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Searching for the customer experience in #ActuallySheCan

Industries today are focusing more and more on customer experience. So what does this mean for pharmaceutical marketers? That you absolutely need to build a customer experience for your product or brand.  What do we mean by customer experience? Customer experience is about building an intentional or planned customer journey. It starts off by leading and then it is maintained though loyalty. I recently came across Allergan’s website  #ActuallySheCan, and did a review on their approach to customer experience.

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What is #ActuallySheCan website about?

As described by Allergan “this campaign is about fostering a discussion among women, not at them. This is a platform and medium for women to get more educated,” Allergan then goes on to explain “This is not just a traditional social-media platform with standard banner ads and tweeting content about a product.”  Right, so let’s move on to content.

Is the content relevant, valuable and useful?

Content experience is about making user experience a good experience. A good experience is what will create your lead and then loyalty.  According to Content Marketing Institute content must be relevant and valuable. In my opinion I really find it hard to see any information at all on the website, let alone it being useful to me. Maybe if I register to their newsletter / email I will receive useful information. But why would I register for information if I can’t find any on the website? May I suggest maybe to research and try to understand your customers first and then build your content experience on that.

Engaging on social media channels?

FaceBook, Twitter, & Instagram photos and messages are pretty much the same across all channels. Trying to foster a discussion with women? Can’t really see a discussion going on. Appears to be just a push of general messages. Suggestion, relevant and useful content will increase your user experience to share and engage with others. Content experience and sharing can only be built after researching and trying to understand your customers.

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Testimonials or influencers?

In seeking an authentic and balanced tone, Allergan states, that it partnered with celebrities including actor Lea Michele, reality television personality Lo Bosworth and Youtube personality iJustine. Maybe what you are looking for are “influencers” more than testimonials. Influencers have the trust of their followers and care very deeply about giving their opinion that is valuable and relevant for their followers. Testimonials are just a traditional marketing “quick” fix voice behind a brand. The outcome is very different. With influencers you will create a true following and fulfill the loyalty part of the customer experience journey.

Are you using emojis and “shemojis” just to attract millennials?

Millennials, although frequent users of emojis,  don’t want brands to communicate with them using emojis. They want to interact with the company in a different ways. Why not ask them how they would like to engage with you? As for “shemojis”, Allergan defines “shemojis” as a website featured technology that allows women to create their own emojis by uploading selfies so users can convert them to “shemojis”.  In my opinion it is always best to first test photo emojis such as is the case with “shemojis” first as a social experiment. See how it resonates before launching to a broader audience.

Twitter & Hospitals

How are hospitals using Twitter?

Which hospitals are using Twitter?

What prompts the consumer to follow hospital Twitter account(s)?

What is the cost of not engaging with Twitter for hospitals?


Mayo Clinic’s Center for Social Media reframes ROI as “risk of ignoring”. Not engaging with digital platforms like Twitter by smaller organizations will allow for greater opportunities to more progressive competitors.

It is all about the user experience thats prompts consumer to follow the hospital. Hospitals need to sustain followers with interesting and useful content.

Study published in Journal of Medical Internet Research finds among hospitals studied: 99.4% had a Facebook account; 99.4% had a Foursquare account; 99.1% had a Yelp account; and 50.8% had a Twitter account. One half of the hospitals studied had an account on all four digital platforms.

Mayo Clinic is named second year in a row as most social media – friendly hospital in the United States.

The facility had:

  • 538,061 Facebook likes/fans;
  • 26,871 Facebook check-ins;
  • 26,545 Facebook mentions;
  • 17,708 Tweets;
  • 858,932 Twitter followers;
  • 1,783 Twitter users it was following; and
  • 9,086 Twitter mentions.

Other top social media friendly hospitals, in order:

  • Cleveland Clinic;
  • Baylor Regional Medical Center in Texas;
  • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston;
  • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center;
  • Rush University Medical Center in Chicago;
  • Houston Methodist Hospital;
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City;
  • University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers; and
  • Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago

Crowd Clinical takes public opinion on hospitals and collates data and uses it effectively.

Twitter and predicting emergency trends. University of Arizona and Dallas-Fort Worth team up to find connections between tweets about asthma and asthma-related emergency room visits.

The utilization of Twitter in the hospital setting has been more beneficial than detrimental in its ability to generate opportunities for cost savings, recruiting, communication with employees and patients, and community reach.